Tweets in broadcast

BROADCAST GUIDELINES / BUT WHAT DOES IT MEAN?

We welcome and encourage the use of Twitter in broadcast media. Our requirements ensure that Twitter users receive proper attribution for their content, and help provide the best experience for your audience. If you follow these guidelines, you do not need to contact Twitter for any additional display or trademark clearances.

Broadcast includes, but is not limited to: the exhibition, distribution, transmission, reproduction, public performance or public display of Tweets by media delivery (all forms of television, radio, satellite, video, closed-circuit wireless, electronic sell-through, etc.), whether existing now or developed hereafter. If you aren’t certain that your specific use is covered by these guidelines, email trademarks [at] Twitter [dot] com.

 



TWEETS
/ DO’S AND DON’T’S

Improve readability by displaying the full name and @username, with some form of style differentiation from the Tweet text (bold, color, size, or another convention). We also recommend you put the full text of the Tweet on a new line.

Do:

  • Show full name, @username, timestamp, Tweet text and profile picture.
  • Include the Twitter bird in close proximity to the Tweets for the duration that they appear in your broadcast. Make sure to follow our logo display guidelines.
  • Use the full text of the Tweet. You may edit or revise Tweet text if you have permission from the original user.

Don’t:

  • Delete, obscure, or alter the identification of the user. You may show Tweets in anonymous form in exceptional cases, for example when you have concerns about user privacy.
  • Exclude the timestamp, unless technical limitations require it.

TWEET DISPLAY / SHOW AND TELL

Here are three options for displaying Tweets. As long as they don’t mislead viewers or misrepresent the Tweet author’s original intent, we are open to other respectful display configurations.

Tweets in the lower third

Ideally, you should animate full, complete Tweets onto the screen and allow them to rest there. Don’t use continuously scrolling text or a crawl that shows only part of a Tweet at a time.

Full-screen Tweets

Use different colors for the full name and @username. Your animation should place one Tweet on the screen at a time. Focus on legibility. Don’t crowd the screen with Tweets.

Tweets as part of a physical set

Often, showing Tweets on a physical monitor, web wall, or as part of a set design element is your most flexible display option. Make sure the Twitter logo is integrated into that element specifically — not overlaid on the screen in a general way.

Showing unattributed data in aggregate or graphical form is permitted, but we ask that you include the official Twitter logo.

IMAGES / A PICTURE’S WORTH A THOUSAND WORDS

Tweets with photos can express an idea or a feeling instantly. Incorporating them effectively can strengthen your broadcast materials and better engage your audience.

Single photo display

Multi-photo display

Do:

  • Display the Twitter bird within the graphic element itself. The image above demonstrates an appropriate scale.
  • Display the Tweet which accompanied the image, including the user’s full name and @username. Consider displaying the associated Tweet below the image, as you would a caption.

Don’t:

  • Edit a user’s images in any way.
  • Remove or separate any images from the original collection.

 



TWITTER RESOURCES / HELP US HELP YOU

By using the Twitter marks, you agree to follow this policy as well as our Terms of Service and all Twitter rules and policies.

Twitter Inc., reserves the right to cancel, modify, or change the permissions in this policy at any time at its sole discretion. For further information about use of the Twitter name and trademarks, email trademarks@twitter.com.